What to Do With Old Electronics?

If you’re like most people, you probably have some old electronics lying around your home that you no longer use. Perhaps it’s an old laptop or CD player that’s been in the back of your closet ever since you upgraded to a new model, or new technology. Or maybe it’s an alarm clock or mobile phone that you haven’t gotten around to throwing out, even though it hasn’t worked in ages.

If any of this rings a bell, Jean Chatzky’s post in Daily Finance may interest you. Chatzky lists several smart ways to get rid of your old electronics – and maybe even make some money in the process. There are three things you can do with old electronics, she says: sell, donate or recycle them.

  1. Sell. Some electronic items, like a fully functional iPad that you replaced with the newest version – can be resold on any number of Web sites. Chatzky suggests uSell.com or Gazelle.com, two sites that offer guidelines on how much to sell your items for.
  2. Donate. Who doesn’t love donating used items? You get the good feeling that comes from knowing your possessions will have a second life with a new owner –  plus you get to claim the donation as a tax deduction. Many secondhand stores will resell your old electronics. Goodwill and Dell have even set up a donation program called Reconnect that accepts damaged items. Just remember to keep your receipt for your taxes.
  3. Recycle. Sometimes old electronics are so far gone that it’s pointless to donate or sell them. But that doesn’t mean you should toss them in the garbage. Many electronic items have components that are terrible for the environment. Some office-supply retail chains, like Office Max and Staples, recycle electronics. You can also check 1800recycling.com for the closest place to recycle electronics near you.

Do you have old electronics that you need to get rid of? Are you most likely to sell, donate or recycle these items?

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